ASHTON WARNER

ASHTON WARNER, AN ENSLAVED AFRICAN IN SAINT VINCENT AND THE GRENADINES, DESCRIBES A DAY IN THE LIFE OF A “FIELD SLAVE” OF A “KIND MASTER” ON THE CANE GROVE ESTATE (This book is available for free online from many sites and in many formats. Just Google it):

I shall here endeavour to describe the manner in which the field gang were worked on Cane Grove estate. They were obliged to be in the field before five o’clock in the morning; and, as the negro houses were at the distance of from three to four miles from the cane pieces, they were generally obliged to rise as early as four o’clock, to be at their work in time. The driver is first in the field, and calls the slaves together by cracking the whip or blowing the conch shell. Before five o’clock the overseer calls over the roll; and if any of the slaves are so unfortunate as to be too late, even by a few minutes, which, owing to the distance, is often the case, the driver flogs them as they come in, with the cart-whip, or with a scourge of tamarind rods. When flogged with the whip, they are stripped and held down upon the ground, and exposed in the most shameful manner.

In the cultivation of the canes the slaves work in a row. Each person has a hoe, and the women are expected to do as much as the men. This work is so hard that any slave, newly put to it, in the course of a month becomes so weak that often he is totally unfit for labour. If he falls back behind the rest, the driver keeps forcing him up with the whip.

They work from five o’clock to nine, when they are allowed to sit down for half an hour in the field, and take such food as they have been able to prepare over night. But many have no food ready, and so fast till mid-day.

They go to work again directly after half an hour’s respite, and labour till twelve o’clock, when they leave off for dinner. They are allowed two hours of mid-day intermission, out of crop time, and an hour and a half in crop time.

During this interval every slave must pick a bundle of grass to bring home for the cattle at night. The grass grows in tufts, often scattered over a great space of ground, and, when the season is dry, it is very scarce and withered, so that the slaves collect it slowly and with difficulty, and are often employed most of the time allowed them for mid-day rest, in seeking for it. I have frequently known them occupied the whole two hours in collecting it.

They work again in gang from two till seven o’clock. It is then dark. When they return home the overseer calls over the roll, and demands of every man and woman their bundles of grass. He weighs with his hand each bundle as it is given in, and, if it be too light, the person who presents it is either instantly laid down and flogged severely with the cart-whip, or is put into the stocks for the whole night. If the slaves bring home no grass, they are not only put into the stocks all night, but are more severely flogged the next morning. This grass-picking is a very sore grievance to the field slaves.

When they are manuring the ground, the slaves are forced to carry the wet manure in open baskets upon their heads. This is most unpleasant as well as severe work. It is a usual occupation for wet weather, and the moisture from the manure drips constantly down upon the faces, and over the body and clothes of the slaves. They are forced to run with their loads as fast as they can; and, if they flag, the driver is instantly at their heels with the cart-whip.

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One thought on “ASHTON WARNER

  1. “Ashton Warner was born in St. Vincent, an island in the West Indies. Daphne Crosbie, Warner’s aunt and a former slave, purchased Warner, his mother, and other relatives and freed them. However, when he was about ten years old, Warner was forced into slavery again because Mr. Wilson, a plantation owner, questioned his claims to freedom. Despite the legal papers his mother and aunt held documenting his freedom, Warner was forced to remain a slave. Although he was not subjected to the same degree of brutality as other slaves, Warner became indignant and often defiant, because he believed in the legitimacy of his status as a free man. He eventually escaped and arrived in England in 1830, where he tried to contact Mr. Wilson in the hope of securing his freedom. Although Mr. Wilson had died, his executors agreed to investigate the matter. However, Ashton Warner died before a decision was reached and his narrative was published.”

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