Marcus Mosiah Garvey (Part nine)

Bequia Did you know? History New York St. Vincent World
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Death

Garvey died in London on 10 June 1940, at the age of 52, having suffered two strokes, putatively after reading a mistaken, and negative, obituary of himself in the Chicago Defender in January earlier that same year, which stated, in part, that Garvey died “broke, alone and unpopular”. Due to travel restrictions during World War II, his body was interred (no burial mentioned but preserved in a lead-lined coffin) within the lower crypt in St. Mary’s Catholic Cemetery in London near Kensal Green Cemetery. Twenty years later, his body was removed from the shelves of the lower crypt and taken to Jamaica, where the government proclaimed him Jamaica’s first national hero and re-interred him at a shrine in the National Heroes Park.[56]Blue plaque, 53 Talgarth Road, London
Blue plaque, 53 Talgarth Road, London

In London, a blue plaque was placed outside the house where Garvey once resided at 53 Talgarth RoadKensington, and a second blue plaque was placed outside 2 Beaumont Crescent, London, the offices of the UNIA where Marcus Garvey and UNIA members conducted their work. There is also a small park named after him between North End Road and Hammersmith Road near Olympia, and a library in Tottenham.

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