HOW TO TACKLE THE MURDER PROBLEM

Sir Godfrey Gregg

I want to address a grave situation in St. Vincent and the Grenadines as the nation has been plunged into a murderous State. If all the reports are true on social media, seven (7) murders in a week are really unacceptable. While no one has control over the mind of an individual, it behooves us to be very vigilant of our surroundings and those we let into our lives. I read where blame is passed to the politicians for the higher rate in the Homeland. I do not share the views expressed.

Nobody really knows the answer to that question, “Why people kill another” because every killer and every killing is unique.

I have put together ten (10) reasons why people kill another:

1. Domestic reasons:

2. Money:

3. Revenge:

4. Alcohol and drugs:

5. Religion arguments:

6. Self-defense:

7. Anger:

8. Greed:

9. Road discipline:

10. Mercy killing:

You may not agree with the order I place things and you have your own opinion which I respect. However, I will try to explain what happens in every instance in my article tomorrow. Again read my article first before coming to a conclusion.

People are often confronted with feelings of disappointment, frustration, and anger as they interact with government officials, co-workers, family and even fellow commuters. Most can control their actions to the extent that relatively few of these interactions end in violence. Sometimes the cognitive control mechanisms required to guide one’s behavior are either nonexistent or ignored, with disastrous consequences. I will caution here that politicians must be aware since disgruntled people lay blame on you for the upsets in their lives. The nonskilled workers always look to the government for employment and when they are turned away or because they do not support your interests anger steps in and the chips falls even if one has to throw stones at a place of worship.

The approach to society needs all hands on deck and this includes the communities, schools, churches, activists, government, and politicians to sit together and work out strategies with a common goal in mind. The symposium must not be seen as a political scoring card, but something that will benefit everyone.

Our young people are looking at every move the adults make. They saw how others were placed before them the citizens of the country they called home. They are seeing the neglect day after day. Nothing trickling down to them and as the disaster struck money was found to handle another country problems, while at the homeland the people are suffering and are rejected after they became victims of their own Hurricane Tomas. Where is the fairness? Unfortunately, killing innocent people is not the answer. The people need to put politics aside and surround the city to demand their justice and employment.

The lands are sold to foreign interests and soon the next generation will have no place to erect a home but to live on the streets. I predict that homelessness will rise in the next 5 years and spiral out of control while the prisons will eventually burst at its seams.  The high-rise in crimes without solutions will be the greatest challenge for the next generation. Almighty God helps us.

White collar crimes in St. Vincent and the Grenadines have surpassed petty larceny. Yet there are no prosecutions to bring to justice those that are involved. There is an old saying, “it is who you know”.

The big question is what are the plans of the Parliament that have the power to make laws to inflict harsher punishment on a convicted murderer. Is the State of St. Vincent and the Grenadines still under the curfew of the Privy Council in London, England? So the gallows was repaired and seem like money has been wasted on property that cannot be used? I will suggest that the gallows be moves to the Capital on the grounds of the Court House and that will may act as a deterrent to an extent. Let the public witness the execution of the Court’s sentence.

 

 

 

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