MEMORIES OF SVG

Did you know? History St. Vincent
image_pdf

I found this post on Jamal Browne’s Facebook page and I am sharing with you. I credit him for his brilliance in researching the Homeland.

“I was fortunate enough to grow up in the suburbs of Kingstown, in the tiny community of Murray’s Village – perched on the hills overlooking the capital city; and the very fact that I was raised in the cultural and administrative capital of St. Vincent & the Grenadines, helped immensely informing my perspective on Vincentian life, culture and development that to this day causes me to see potential and opportunity amidst sweeping cynicism.” – (Excerpt from my new book: ‘Defying the Odds – Your Personal Guide to Victorious Living’)

– What are your memories of life in Kingstown?

– What role has life in this city played in your personal and professional development?

– What can we do to preserve its historical value while making it a better place for current and future generations?

I also invite you to share this post with a friend or tag someone who might be interested in sharing their story of Kingstown.

Image may contain: one or more people, tree, sky and outdoor

Kingstown long before motor vehicles became the norm

Image may contain: one or more people, text and outdoor

The donkey and carriage served as a major form of transportation in and around Kingstown before motor vehicles became readily accessible.

Image may contain: text and outdoor

Affluent locals and business operators initiated the transition from the traditional horse/ donkey and carriage to automobiles – the likes of the Ford Model T made popular in the 1920s.

Image may contain: house and outdoor

The Kingstown Public Library remains one of the best restored and up-kept historical building around the capital.

Image may contain: bridge and outdoor

Washing in the famous ‘North River’ was quite a trend at one point in the capital’s history. I can only imagine the many relationships that were built – and broken perhaps – through this long-forgotten tradition. Grenville and McCoy streets can be seen in the background.

Image may contain: one or more people, people standing, wedding and outdoor

Long before hillside mansions and office buildings became a trend within the suburbs, there was an unimpeded view of the capital from every hill overlooking Kingstown. It was the norm for these women (photographed). Today, it is a luxury that comes at a significant cost.

Image may contain: sky, outdoor and nature

The view of the capital from Kingstown Hill – popularly known as ‘Town Hill’.

Image may contain: 1 person, standing

Local business operators in Kingstown. Let’s just say that the social structure of our society has changed immensely over the years.

Image may contain: outdoor

It was a common trend for local business operators to operate their businesses on the ground floor, while living on the first. The ease of commuting brought by the diffusion of the automobile into society, has however taken local proprietors further and further away from the capital over the years.

Image may contain: sky, outdoor and water

In a time before the ‘Reclamation Site’, local fisherfolk, cargo boat, and small ferry operators used this landing point on the edge of what is today known as Bay Street – yards away from the entrance of the headquarters of the Royal St. Vincent & the Grenadines Police Force.

Image may contain: one or more people, crowd and outdoor

Kingstown Bay has long served as a major source of income for many Vincentians from all walks of life. A lot has changed over the years, but this bay continues to serve the needs of many Vincentians to this day.

Image may contain: one or more people, sky, boat, outdoor and water

This photograph confirms that these small boats were once used to transport persons along the coastline.

Image may contain: outdoor and water

Storm surges are a most common phenomenon in Kingstown Bay.

Image may contain: ocean, sky, water, outdoor and nature

These rough seas in Kingstown Bay are believed to have been caused by Hurricane Janet in September 1955.

Image may contain: outdoor

One of the first retail fuel pumps to be installed in Kingstown.

Image may contain: 3 people, people standing, people walking and outdoor

Vincentian War Veterans and Civilian Servicemen and women are to this day remembered annually on the second Sunday of November – ‘Remembrance Day’ – for their roles in previous World Wars. Let us remember the contributions of our veterans on and off the battlefield.

Image may contain: one or more people, crowd and outdoor

The Kingstown Vegetable Market has gone through many iterations over the years.

Image may contain: 2 people, crowd and outdoor

Vincentians have always been passionate about their politics. Just look at this crowd engulfing Former Prime Minister Sir James Mitchell. Little has changed since then. We must however find a way to maintain order and mutual respect amidst our political differences.

Image may contain: 3 people, crowd and outdoor

The St. Vincent Cadet Corps leads a procession through the streets of Kingstown.

Image may contain: sky, house and outdoor

Can you guess where this is?

Image may contain: one or more people, tree, sky and outdoor

Kingstown long before motor vehicles became the norm.

Image may contain: one or more people, text and outdoor

The donkey and carriage served as a major form of transportation in and around Kingstown before motor vehicles became readily accessible.

Image may contain: text and outdoor

Affluent locals and business operators initiated the transition from the traditional horse/ donkey and carriage to automobiles – the likes of the Ford Model T made popular in the 1920s.

Image may contain: house and outdoor

 

 

image_pdf
Average Rating
5 out of 5 stars. 1 votes.
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.